dishonest


dishonest
dishonest, deceitful, mendacious, lying, untruthful are comparable especially when applying to persons, their utterances, and their acts and meaning deficient in honesty and unworthy of trust or belief. Dishonest may apply to any breach of honesty or trust (as by lying, deceiving, stealing, cheating, or defrauding)
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a dishonest statement

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a dishonest employee

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while it would be dishonest to gloss over this weakness, one must understand it in terms of the circumstances that conspired to produce it—Mum ford

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years ago a few dishonest men traveled about the country, saying that they could make rain— Craig & Urban

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Deceitful usually implies the intent to mislead or to impose upon another in order to obscure one's real nature or actual purpose or intention, or the true character of something offered, given, or sold; it therefore usually suggests a' false or specious appearance, indulgence in falsehoods, cheating, defrauding, or double-dealing
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deceitful propaganda

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deceitful testimony

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she was a deceitful, scheming little thing— Zangwill

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Mendacious is typically more formal than, often less derogatory than, but otherwise closely equivalent to lying, the ordinary, direct, unequivocal word
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silly newspapers and magazines for the circulation of lying advertisements— Shaw

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a lying account of the accident

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go aboard the ships that caught his interest where the masters ... set out wine and told him mendacious tales of their trade— Wheelwright

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while the communication was deceptive and so intended, it was not technically mendaciousS. H. Adams

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As applied to persons mendacious more often suggests the habitude of deceit while lying suggests guilt in respect to a particular instance; thus, one might describe a persorf as mendacious with primary reference to his character or habit but would ordinarily prefer lying when a particular instance is in view
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a mendacious child is doubted even when telling the truth

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only a lying scoundrel would tell such a tale

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Untruthful is often used in place of mendacious or lying as a slightly less brutal word; however, the term distinctively implies lack of correspondence between what is said or represented and the facts of the case or the reality, and is often applied to statements, accounts, reports, or descriptions with little stress on dis-honesty or intent to deceive
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an untruthful account of an incident

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the artist's representation of the scene at Versailles was untruthful in many of its details

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Analogous words: *crooked, devious, oblique: false, *faithless, perfidious: cheating, cozening, defrauding, swindling (see CHEAT vb)
Antonyms: honest
Contrasted words: *upright, honorable, scrupulous, conscientious, just: *straightforward, forthright, above-board: candid, open, *frank, plain

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

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  • Dishonest — Dis*hon est, a. [Pref. dis + honest: cf. F. d[ e]shonn[^e]te, OF. deshoneste.] 1. Dishonorable; shameful; indecent; unchaste; lewd. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Inglorious triumphs and dishonest scars. Pope. [1913 Webster] Speak no foul or dishonest… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dishonest — I adjective beguiling, bogus, cheating, conniving, conscienceless, contrary to fact, corrupt, corruptible, counterfeit, cunning, deceitful, deceiving, deceptive, delusive, delusory, designing, destitute of good faith, destitute of integrity,… …   Law dictionary

  • Dishonest — Dis*hon est, v. t. [Cf. OF. deshonester.] To disgrace; to dishonor; as, to dishonest a maid. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] I will no longer dishonest my house. Chapman. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dishonest — [dis än′ist] adj. [ME < OFr deshoneste, altered (after des , DIS ) < L dehonestus: see DE & HONEST] not honest; lying, cheating, etc. dishonestly adv. SYN. DISHONEST implies the act or practice of telling a lie, or of cheating, deceiving,… …   English World dictionary

  • dishonest — (adj.) late 14c., from O.Fr. deshoneste (13c., Mod.Fr. déshonnête) dishonorable, horrible, indecent, perhaps from a M.L. or Gallo Rom. compound of L. dis not (see DIS (Cf. dis )) + honestus honorable (see HONEST (Cf. honest)). The Latin formation …   Etymology dictionary

  • dishonest — [adj] lying, untruthful backbiting*, bent, bluffing, cheating, corrupt, crafty, crooked, cunning, deceitful, deceiving, deceptive, designing, disreputable, double crossing, double dealing, elusive, false, fraudulent, guileful, hoodwinking*,… …   New thesaurus

  • dishonest — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ not honest, trustworthy, or sincere. DERIVATIVES dishonestly adverb dishonesty noun …   English terms dictionary

  • dishonest — adj. dishonest to + inf. (it is dishonest to lie about one s age) * * * [dɪs ɒnɪst] dishonest to + int. (it is dishonest to lie about one s age) …   Combinatory dictionary

  • dishonest — adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French deshoneste, from des dis + honeste honest Date: 14th century 1. obsolete shameful, unchaste 2. characterized by lack of truth, honesty, or trustworthiness ; unfair …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • dishonest — [[t]dɪsɒ̱nɪst[/t]] ADJ GRADED: oft it v link ADJ to inf If you say that a person or their behaviour is dishonest, you mean that they are not truthful or honest and that you cannot trust them. You have been dishonest with me... It would be… …   English dictionary


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